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 *********Five Common Contagious Children’s Skin Ailments in Japan

Five Common Contagious Children’s Skin Ailments in Japan – What is it? How to cure?

School is in session which means sports and sitting close to each other, but also some contagious children’s ailments. Be prepared and know what to look for. Here are five common contagious children’s ailments in Japan.  We also have a list of skin conditions which are causes by heat and bugs here. To help you out we consulted with one of our family’s dermatologists Dr. Chin-huai Keong, M.D., Ph.D.@ Garden Clinic Hirooabout the most common contagious skin ailments in Japan. When in doubt it is always best to visit your doctor, but if you can’t wait to find out try to determine from the five skin ailments. If the skin rash is possible heat or bug related check more skin ailments here.  To help you survive the Japan summer with kids, we also have some recommendations here –Tokyo Hot Summers, Keeping the Kids Cool,  Five Ways to Protect Baby this Summer and Japanese Sun Protection Guide.

1.  Toppatsusei Hosshin ( 突発性発しん / とっぱつせいほっしん) –  Roseala 

2. Ringobyo (りんご病) – Infectious erythema/ Fifth Disease

3. Teashikuchibyou () – Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease (HFMD)

4. Atama-shirami (頭しらみ) – Head Lice  

5. Ibo イボ 疣贅 – Common Warts (Verruca, also Plantar Warts)

Five Common Contagious Children’s Skin Ailments in Japan – What is it? How to cure?

roseala, Five Common Contagious Children’s Skin Ailments in Japan1.  Toppatsusei Hosshin ( 突発性発しん / とっぱつせいほっしん) –  Roseala 

Q. What is Roseala?

A. Roseala is a viral disease of infants and young children (usually under 2 years). It is  characterized by sudden high fever  (39–40 °C; 102.2-104 °F0), and mild sore throat. As the fever subsides after 2-3 days a red rash will appear usually first on the truck and then spread to legs and neck. The rash is not itchy and lasts 1-2 days. It is caused by two human herpesviruses, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7), which are sometimes referred to collectively as Roseolovirus.

Q. Is there an at home treatment? When should we head to the doctor?

A. Treatment in most cases can be handled at home with fever-reducing medicine like acetaminophen (Tylenol) and cool sponge baths. Visit the doctor if your child is younger than six months and fever is very high. Some children may develop seizures when they get a high fever.
* Aspirin should NOT be given for viral illnesses in children under the age of 18.

Q. What are the typical treatments for Toppatsusei hosshin (Rosella) at a Japan clinic?

A.There is no specific treatment for roseala.  The disease most often gets better on its own without complication.

Q. Can my child attend school with Toppatsusei hosshin (Rosella)? Can they go in a pool?

A. Children may attend school or enter a pool once the fever subsides and the child is comfortable enough to do so.

 *********Five Common Contagious Children’s Skin Ailments in Japan

2. Ringobyo (りんご病, nfectious erythema/ Fifth Disease, Five Common Contagious Children’s Skin Ailments in Japan Infectious erythema/ Fifth Disease

Q. What is Ringobyo

A. It is a one a manifestation of infection by parvovirus B19. Any age may be affected although it is most common in children aged five to fifteen years. Outbreaks can arise especially in nursery schools, preschools, and elementary schools. The fifth disease starts with a low-grade fever, headache, rash, and cold-like symptoms, such as a runny or stuffy nose. These symptoms pass, then a few days later the rash appears. The bright red rash most commonly appears in the face, particularly the cheeks (“slapped cheek” appearance). In addition to red cheeks, children often develop a red, lacy rash on the rest of the body, with the upper  arms, torso, and legs being the most common locations. The rash typically lasts a couple of days and may itch; some cases have been known to last for several weeks. Patients are usually no longer infectious once the rash has appeared.
Occasionally parents may catch the virus from their infected child, and adults who get it might suffer from joint pains and swelling.

Q. Is there an at home treatment? When should we head to the doctor?

A. Over the counter fever reducer and pain reliever may be taken. The rash is not itchy, although it can be painful.
* Aspirin should NOT be given for viral illnesses in children under the age of 18.

Q. What are the typical treatments for Ringobyo at a Japan clinic?

A. If the fever is very high or pain of the rash becomes uncomfortable, visit a doctor to get a prescription to reduce the fever or pain.

Q. Can my child attend school with Ringobyo? Can they go in a pool?

A. Once the rash has started the person is no longer infectious, and the child may attend school/ go into the pool once he/she feels comfortable enough.

 *********Five Common Contagious Children’s Skin Ailments in Japan

3. Teashikuchibyou  (手足口病)Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease (HFMD)Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease

Q. What is HFMD?

A. HFMD is a common viral infection caused by the Coxsackie virus and children under the age of 10 are most often affected. The disease occurs often in the summer and early fall. The virus is spread from person-to-person through tiny air droplets that are released when the sick person sneezes, coughs or blows his nose. A healthy person can also get infected if he/she touches the fluid from a broken blister or the stool of an infected person.  The infected person may show symptoms of fever, loss of appetite, sore throat, tender or painful sores on the hands, feet and mouth and throat.

Q.  Is there an at home treatment? When should we head to the doctor?

A. Over-the-counter acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen could be used to treat the fever.
*Aspirin should NOT be given for viral illnesses in children under the age of 18.
Have your child drink plenty of fluids.  Seizures may occur in some children due to high fever. If you child shows signs of convulsions or dehydration, please seek medical attention.

Q. What are the typical treatments for HFMD at a Japan clinic?

A.There is no specific treatment for the infection other than symptom relief. Antibiotics do not work because the infection is viral and not caused by a bacteria.  Your doctor may prescribe an antihistamine/ fever reducer medicine and topical steroids if the sores and blisters are painful/itchy.

Q. Can my child attend school with HMFD? Can they go in a pool?

A.  Your child may need a doctor’s permission to resume school. Your child is allowed to attend school and enter the pool once there is no more fever, and he/she feels comfortable enough to eat food normally.

 *********Five Common Contagious Children’s Skin Ailments in Japan

4. Atama-shirami (headlice, 頭しらみ頭しらみ)/ Head Lice

Q. What is head lice?
A. Head lice are parasites. They live on people’s heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse is about the size of a sesame seed; the eggs, called nits, the size of a knot in thread. Lice and nits are found on the scalp.

Lice spread by close person-to-person contact. It is possible, but not common, to get lice by sharing hats or hairbrushes. Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to do with getting head lice. Head lice do not spread disease.
However, head lice is highly contagions and can quickly become a community problem if left untreated.

Symptoms include frequent itching and a tickling sensation of the scalp, sores from scratching, and irritability and difficulty in sleeping.

Q.  Is there an at home treatment? When should we head to the doctor?
A.
Most times, the school nurse or school may inform you that your child is infected, or you may discover the lice/nits on your child’s scalp. Other times, a circular may come from school informing you of an outbreak at school.  Sometimes you may be asked to take your child to a doctor’s office to confirm if you child has head lice. The doctor usually checks the scalp and may remove a louse or nit for inspection under the microscope to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment is Japan is usually by applying Sumisurin shampoo or powder (may be purchased at drug stores).  The shampoo/powder only kills the adult lice, so repeated treatment every 3 days for 2 weeks (about 4 treatments) are recommended.  Nits could be removed with a special fine
toothcomb.

Treatment is recommended for people who have an active infestation of head lice. All household members and other close contacts should be checked and treated if necessary.

Q. Can my child attend school with head lice? Can they go in a pool?

A.Your child may be asked to see a doctor to obtain permission to resume school. The child must have started at least one treatment before resuming school or pool activities.

 *********Five Common Contagious Children’s Skin Ailments in Japan

5. Ibo (イボ 疣贅イボ 疣贅) Common Warts (Verruca, also plantar warts)

Q. What are warts?
A. Warts are caused by an infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). You are more likely to get one of these viruses if you cut or damage your skin in some way. Wart viruses are contagious. Warts can spread by contact with the wart or something that touched the wart. Warts are often skin-colored and feel rough, but they can be dark (brown or gray-black), flat, and smooth.
Children and teenagers are more likely to get them. Warts are often seen on the hands, around the fingernails or on the back of hands. Plantar warts often grow on the soles, sometimes in clusters, and may hurt during walking.


Q. How can we prevent warts?

A. Warts can spread from person to person. You can get warts from touching a wart on someone’s body. To prevent warts from spreading, avoid picking or scratching at warts. Keep feet dry, always wear pool shoes or flip flops in public showers, pool areas or changing rooms.
It often takes a few months for warts to grow large enough to see.
Untreated warts may take 6 months to a few years to disappear on their own.

Q. Are there any home treatments?

A.Often times, warts go away without any treatment.
In Japan, you may purchase some home remedies like salicylic acid pads (supiruko) or ibokorori to apply on warts. However, if you are unable to get rid of the warts with home remedies, you have many warts, or they hurt, you should see a dermatologist.
Cryotherapy (the application liquid nitrogen to freeze the warts) is the most common and relatively  non-painful method used to treat warts. Repeated treatments may be necessary in most cases.
Other methods like laser therapy, electro curettage, surgery, immunotherapy are also available but seldom employed.

Five Common Contagious Children’s Ailments in Japan – What is it? How to cure?

*Reference material was obtained from the Internet mostly from https://medlineplus.gov.

Insert Bio and Photo of Dr. Include link to Garden Clinic Website.

Dr. Chin-Huai Keong is a board-certified dermatologist with more than 25 years of experience in the field. She offers consultations for pediatric, adult & cosmetic dermatology at Garden Clinic Hiroo. She is familiar with the needs of the foreign patient and speaks fluent English and Japanese.
Website: www.gardenclinic-hiroo.com
Facebook page: www.facebook.com/gardenclinichiroo
Tel : 03-6427-9198

Five Common Contagious Children’s Skin Ailments in Japan – What is it? How to cure?

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